TFP In the News

AARP Website, December 2016 – Eileen Ambrose interviewed Steve Thalheimer to get some tips on how one might try to live on Social Security in retirement alone, if faced with this daunting possibility. Click here to read the article.

The Wall St. Journal, August, 2016 – Journalist Veronica Dagher featured Steve Thalheimer as one of three financial advisers who came to financial planning after working in another field. Steve explains why he switched careers, the lessons he takes with him from his former life, and gives advice to those considering a shift to a financial planning career. Click here to read the article.

Washingtonian, April, 2016 – For the sixth time, Washingtonian Magazine named Steve Thalheimer as one of the top financial planners in the DC metropolitan area. The editors of Washingtonian surveyed hundreds of financial advisers across the region and asked them the following question: “Whom would you trust with your own money?” They then followed up the survey with their own research, and listed those advisers who received the most recommendations. Steve’s colleagues, other financial advisers, recognized him as an adviser with whom they would trust their own money.

Washingtonian, November 2014 -Washingtonian Magazine once again named Steve Thalheimer as one of the top financial planners in the DC metropolitan area. The list was again based upon a survey of hundreds of financial advisers across the region asking “Whom would you trust with your own money?”

Washington Lawyer, January 2012 – Steve was quoted in the publication of the DC Bar Association on how the recession of the past few years has impacted the investments and the ability of clients to save, the need to recognize trade-offs between goals, and to approach one’s financial planning with a sense of balance.

LiveScience.com, May 2011 – Steve was interviewed for an online publication on the psychological toll the recession was taking on clients, and how not fully understanding one’s financial status – or having some confusion over future goals and how to achieve them – is contributing to Americans’ overall negative outlook. “I think a lot of what people are feeling is unease, because they don’t know where they are in terms of their financial standing and security,” Steve said.

Washingtonian, November 2010 -Washingtonian Magazine once again named Steve Thalheimer as one of the top financial planners in the DC metropolitan area. The list was again based upon a survey of hundreds of financial advisers across the region asking “Whom would you trust with your own money?”

Baltimore Sun, November, 2010 – Steve was quoted by personal finance columnist Eileen Ambrose on the impact of low interest rates on savers, who are looking for both safety and higher returns than currently being paid by most bank accounts. If you want safety above all else, there are very few options in this economic environment.

The Washington Blade, September, 2010 – Steve was profiled in Washington’s leading newspaper for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community on working with non-traditional couples and middle-income clients. Though some states are becoming friendlier to the gay community, “We are still lacking equality at the federal level. There is a real need to plan comprehensively for gay, lesbian and non-traditional clients.”

Washingtonian, January 2009 – Washingtonian Magazine once again named Steve Thalheimer as one of the top 33 financial planners in the DC metropolitan area. The list was again based upon a survey of hundreds of financial advisors across the region asking “Whom would you trust with your own money?”

Washington Post, “Ask The Experts”, April and June, 2008 – Steve Thalheimer was featured three times over the spring and summer in the Washington Post’s Ask The Experts series, providing real-world solutions to common client questions on credit scores, what do to with a $10,000 windfall, and how to pay for college.

Baltimore Sun, June, 2008 – Steve Thalheimer was again quoted in the Baltimore Sun on how to survive an unexpected job loss. He explained why financial advisors are always nagging their clients to maintain an adequate cash emergency fund. “It just gives you some breathing room”, Steve says. “Unfortunately, many people either don’t have such a fund or the amount set aside is often too little.”

Consumer Reports Money Adviser, October 2007 – In a story on phased retirement, which refers to various ways of making a gradual transition from full-time work to retirement, Steve Thalheimer suggests that you have your benefits office run the numbers to see how a reduced schedule and salary would affect your future retirement benefits. For example, you could lose your employer’s 401(k) match if you’re no longer working a sufficient number of hours. And if you have a defined-benefit plan, phased retirement could mean a smaller check once you start collecting, depending on the formula your plan uses to calculate benefits. What’s more, the simple fact that you’re taking in less income may make it harder to find money to put into your 401(k) or other retirement savings.

Washington Post, December 2006 – Steve Thalheimer was interviewed and quoted for the cover story of the Sunday business section by staff writer Kathleen Day on classic ways even financially successful people can let money slip away. If you make a financial mistake, not getting tied down emotionally and admitting the mistake is the most important step. Then, evaluating options to correct it or get out of it – and getting enough information about those options – the next. “Don’t just react,” says Steve, “It’s probable that an emotion-based reaction got you into this situation, so don’t try to get out of it based on emotion alone.”

Washington Post, July 2006 – Steve Thalheimer was interviewed and quoted for the cover story of the Sunday business section by staff writer Brooke A. Masters on how to realize when you’ve made a bad investment decision, and when to get out of it. Sometimes people buy the wrong products that are either very expensive or inappropriate for their needs and goals, or pride gets in the way and people don’t want to admit they’ve made a mistake. Often it’s worth just getting out. TFP helps clients make these determinations.

Washington Post, July 2006 – In a related story, Steve Thalheimer cited a common mistake of investors not adequately considering their own in-state section 529 College Savings Plans. Although the Washington, DC area 529 Plans are not considered particularly low fee, the tax benefits often outweigh the slightly higher fees for most investors, said Steve.

Virtual Office News, November 2004 – Steve Thalheimer was interviewed and quoted for an article on options to protect computer data in the article “Worried About Security? You Should Be!”, by financial planner and technology consultant Joel Bruckenstein. In this publication for financial planners, Steve describes his experience with one software program.

Wall Street Journal, February 2004 – Steve Thalheimer was quoted in the article “Planning to Change Jobs? Get in Fit Financial Shape” which discussed ways to plan ahead to minimize the financial impact if you’re considering a job change. Steve warned job changers on the dangers of cashing out employer-sponsored retirement savings accounts

Washington Post, May, 2003 – Steve Thalheimer was quoted in the article “Bye-Bye, Small Fry” that reviewed the financial planning options available to middle income consumers, as many large brokerage firms are referring clients with small accounts to “call centers”. He contrasted the impersonal, sales-driven services of these firms with the personalized, independent and objective services TFP provides – with no income or asset minimums.

Washingtonian, January, 2003 — Steve Thalheimer was named one of the best financial planners in the Washington DC area. “Good financial help does not have to be hard to find,” says the writer. “Here are 156 people you can trust with your money.”

Morningstar Advisor, November, 2002 – Steve Thalheimer was profiled in an article on experience as a factor in providing financial planning services. Steve was a Peace Corps employee and Volunteer before he became a financial planner. Thalheimer’s prior work “gives me experience in thinking holistically, teaching, training, motivating and empowering clients to take action to improve their lives,” he says. “My previous career gave me good analytical and research skills, and after completing the CFP® curriculum and professional experience requirements, I felt very well equipped to provide quality planning services and professional advice. I also maintain a rigorous program of continuing education,” he concludes.

Bloomberg Wealth Manager, October, 2001 — Steve Thalheimer was featured in “Planning 101 — And Beyond.” The article discussed how professional study groups within the financial planning industry help advisors learn, stay current, adapt and grow to better serve their clientele.

Baltimore Sun, March 4, 2001 — Steve Thalheimer was profiled and pictured in the Baltimore Sun “Dollars & Sense” section. In this personal finance article, the writer urges readers to “invest time in creating a regular savings plan.” Steve and other financial experts agree that even those with limited resources can set goals and squeak out savings. Tips for middle-income families include: developing a financial plan; paying bills on time; paying off credit card debt; working in small steps; automating savings; and creating a support network. In his financial planning sessions, Steve helps his clients “get goals.” “A savings plan can include both short- and long-term goals. Attaining even a short-term goal can encourage more savings,” he says.

Reader’s Digest New Choices, March 2001 — Steve Thalheimer, was quoted in an article called “A Financial Checklist for Empty Nesters.” Writer Linda Stern urges empty nesters to review their financial priorities and provides a handful of tips to get them started. One suggestion: Look hard at your life insurance. “You might not need it, or you might need less,” said Steve.